The Hidden Hand Behind Bad Catholic Music

A VERY informative article from J. A. Turner at Catholic Culture:

It usually starts with the missalettes — those lightweight booklets scattered around the pews of your parish church. They contain all the readings of the Sunday Masses, plus some hymns and responses in the back. There’s nothing between the covers that would offend an orthodox sense of the faith, and most of the songs are traditional by today’s standards. 

So, what’s the problem? 

Well, if your missalettes are like those issued in more than half of American parishes, they’re copyrighted by the Oregon Catholic Press (OCP) — the leading Catholic purveyor of bad music in the United States. Four times a year, it prints and distributes 4.3 million copies of the seemingly unobjectionable booklets (which OCP doesn’t call missalettes). 

But that’s just the beginning of its massive product line, where each item is integrated perfectly with the others to make liturgical planning quick and easy. To instruct and guide parish musicians and liturgy teams, the OCP prints hymnals, choral scores, children’s songbooks, Mass settings, liturgy magazines (with detailed instructions that are slavishly followed by parishes around the country), and CDs for planning liturgies and previewing the newest music. 

This collection of products, however, does not include a hymnal — or anything else — designed to appeal to traditional sensibilities (its Heritage Hymnal is deceptively misnamed). The OCP’s experts never tire of promoting the new, rewriting the old, and inviting you to join them in their quest to “sing a new church into being” (as one of their hit songs urges). The one kind of “new” that the OCP systematically avoids is the new vogue of traditional music that has proved so appealing to young Catholics. 

The bread and butter of the OCP are the 10,000 music copyrights it owns. It employs a staff of 150, runs year-round liturgy workshops all over the United States, sponsors affiliates in England and Australia, and keeps song-writers all over the English-speaking world on its payroll. In fact, it’s the preferred institutional home of those now-aging “St. Louis Jesuits” who swept out the old in 1969 and, by the mid-1970s, had parishes across the country clapping and strumming and tapping to the beat. 

The OCP also sails under the flags of companies it has acquired, established, or represented along the way: New Dawn Music, Pastoral Press, North American Liturgy Resources, Trinitas, TEAM Publications, White Dove Productions, and Cooperative Ministries. Every time it purchases — or assumes the distribution of — another publisher, its assets and influence grow. 

Power Without Authority 

But while the OCP dictates the liturgies of most U.S. parishes, it has no ecclesiastical authority. It’s a large nonprofit corporation — a publishing wing of the Diocese of Portland — and nothing else. It has never been empowered by the U.S. bishops, much less Rome, to oversee music or liturgy in American parishes. 

The OCP’s power over Catholic liturgy is derived entirely from its copyrights, phenomenal sales, and marketing genius. Nonetheless, it wields the decisive power in determining the musical culture of most public Masses in the United States. 

And once a parish dips into the product line of the OCP, it is very difficult to avoid full immersion. So complete and integrated is their program that it actually reconstructs the sense that the liturgy team has about what Catholicism is supposed to feel and sound like. 

But few of those subject to the power of the OCP understand that it’s the reason why Catholic liturgy so often seems like something else entirely. For example, pastors who try to control the problem by getting a grip on their liturgies quite often sense that they’re dealing with an amorphous power without a name or face. That’s because very few bother to examine the lay-directed materials that are shaping the liturgies. Too many priests are willing to leave music to the musicians, fearing that they lack the competence to intervene. 

Meanwhile, the nature of the OCP is completely unknown to most laypeople. Many Catholics shudder, for example, when they hear the words Glory & Praise, the prototypical assortment of musical candy that was already stale about 15 years ago but which mysteriously continues to be repackaged and rechewed in parish after parish. “Here I am, Lord,” “Be Not Afraid,” “City of God,” “One Bread, One Body,” “Celtic Alleluia,” and (wait for it) “On Eagle’s Wings” — these all come courtesy of the OCP. 

But at the publisher itself, this moldy repertoire is not an embarrassment. On the contrary, the publisher brags that Glory & Praise, whose copyright it acquired in 1994, continues to be the best-selling Catholic hymnal of all time. And what about those prayers of the faithful that seem far more politically than doctrinally correct? They’re probably from the OCP, too. A new edition of its Prayer of the Faithful is printed every year. (In what is surely great news for the unrepentant, the OCP brags that the volume helpfully includes “creative alternatives to the Penitential Rite.”) 

Hijacking Of Catholic Truth 

It wasn’t always like this. Before 1980, the OCP was called the Oregon Catholic Truth Society. It was founded in 1922 in response to a compulsory school-education law that forced Catholics to attend public schools. Archbishop Alexander Christie got together with his priests to found the society. Its aim: to fight bigotry and stand up for truth and Catholic rights. 

In 1934, the Oregon Catholic Truth Society released a missal called My Sunday Missal. It was good-looking, inexpensive, and easy to use. It became the most popular missal ever (you can still run across it in used bookstores). 

But the rest of the story is as familiar as it is troubling. Sometime in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Oregon Catholic Truth Society began to lose its moorings. Catholic truth had to make room for the Age of Aquarius. Thus, in the course of a single decade, a once-reliable representative of Catholic teaching became reliably unreliable. Money given to the organization to promote truth was now being used to advance a revolutionary approach to Catholic life, one that repudiated traditional forms of the faith. The only thing that did not change was the breadth of its influence: Under the new dispensation, it was still a powerhouse of Catholic publishing. 

De Profundis 

If you’ve been keeping up with the OCP’s latest offerings, you know that the songs from the mid-1970s don’t begin to plumb the depths. The newest OCP hymnals are jam-packed with music from the 1980s and 1990s, with styles meant to reflect the popular music trends of the time. (Actually, they’re about five years behind the times.) 

They sail under different names (Music Issue, Journeysongs, Heritage Hymnal, Glory & Praise), but the content is similar in all of them: an eclectic, hit-and-miss bag with an emphasis on new popular styles massaged for liturgical use. (Worst choice: Spirit & Song, which “encourages the youth and young adults of today to praise God in their own style”) 

Some of the newer songs sound like variations on the musical themes you hear at the beginning of TV sitcoms. Some sound like Broadway-style love songs. Others have a vague Hawaiian, calypso, or blues feel. You never know what’s going to pop up next. 

Not all of it is terrible. In fact, there are real toe-tappers among the songs. The question to ask, however, is whether it’s right for liturgy. The answer from the Church has been the same from the second century to the present day: The Mass requires special music, which is different from secular music and popular religious music. It must have its own unique voice — one that works, like the liturgy itself, to bring together time and eternity. It’s a style perfectly embodied in chant, polyphony, and traditional hymnody. 

The OCP revels in its ability to conflate these categories; indeed, that’s the sum total of its purpose and effect. And judging from its newest new line of songs and CDs — “we just couldn’t wait until our next General Catalog to tell you about it” — your parish can look forward to a variety of ska and reggae songs adapted for congregational purposes. 

How It Hooks You 

But let’s go back to that innocent, floppy missalette. The OCP claims it has many advantages. Missalettes “make it easy for you to introduce the latest music to your parish, and changes in Church rituals are easy to implement.” Thus the missalette is “always up-to-date.” 

It’s also quite a bargain. If you buy more than 50 subscriptions to the quarterly missalette, you receive other goodies bundled inside. You’ll get a Music Issue (the main OCP hymnal) to supplement the thin selection in the missalette. In addition, you’ll receive a keyboard accompaniment book, a guitar book, the Choral Praise Comprehensive, a handy service binder, two annual copies of Respond & Acclaim for the psalm and the gospel acclamation, biannual copies of Prayer of the Faithful, two subscriptions to Today’s Liturgy (which tells liturgy teams what to sing and say, when and how), and one master index. And the more you buy, the more you get. 

Why would you want all this stuff? Well, if you’re in parish music, you’ll quickly discover that the missalette has too few hymns to cover the whole season. The Music Issue seems like an economical purchase. But there’s something odd about the OCP’s most popular music book: There’s no scriptural index. How do you know what hymns fit with what gospel reading? 

No problem. Just buy a copy of Today’s Liturgy, which spells it all out for you. If you want a broader selection of possible hymns, you can also order the OCP’s LitPlan software or its monthly Choral Resources, which is visually more complicated than the Federal Register (but still contains no scriptural index). 

If you follow the free liturgical planner closely, you’ll notice you can purchase a variety of choral arrangements and special new music (copyright OCP) that match perfectly with the response, the hymnal, and the missalette (copyright OCP), which is itself integrated with the prayers of the faithful (copyright OCP) and the gospel (not yet OCP copyright). And so it goes, until you follow the complete OCP plan for each Mass, from the first “Good morning, Father!” to the last “Go in peace to love and serve others!” By making each element dependent on the next, the OCP has ensured a steady — if trapped — clientele. 

Musical Gnosticism 

But why should the liturgy team go along with this program? The average parish musical team is made up of non-professionals. Its poorly paid members are untrained in music history; they have no particular craving for chant or polyphony, which often seems quite remote to them. Most musicians in average Catholic parishes would have no idea how to plug into the rite an extended musical setting from, say, the high Renaissance, even if they had the desire to do so. 

The OCP understands this point better than most publishers. In an interview, Michael Prendergast, editor of Today’s Liturgy, pointed again and again to the limited resources of typical parishes. The OCP sees serving such needs as a core part of its publishing strategy; its materials keep reminding us that we don’t need to know Church music to get involved. 

Lack of familiarity with the Church’s musical tradition would not be a grave problem if there were a staple of standard hymns and Mass settings to fall back on. But it has been at least 30 years since such a setting was available in most parishes. The average parish musician wants to use his talents to serve the parish in whatever way possible, but he’s at a complete loss as to how to do it without outside guidance. The OCP fills that vacuum. 

Under its tutelage, you can aspire to be a real liturgical expert, which means you have attended a few workshops run by OCP-connected guitarists and songwriters (who explain that your job as a musician is to whip people into a musical frenzy: loud microphones, drum tracks, over-the-top enthusiasm when announcing the latest hymn). These “experts” love the OCP’s material because it allows them to keep up the pretense that they have some special knowledge about what hymns should be used for what occasions and how the Mass ought to proceed. 

Real Catholic musicians who have worked with the OCP material tell horror stories of incredible liturgical malpractice. The music arrangements are often muddled and busy, making it all but impossible for regular parishioners to sing. This is especially true of arrangements for traditional songs, where popular chords give old hymns a gauzy cast that reminds you of the 1970s group Chicago. 

The liturgical planning guides are a ghastly embarrassment. Two years ago, for example, the liturgical planner recommended “Seek Ye First” for the first Sunday in Lent (“Al-le-lu-, Al-le-lu-yah”). In numerous slots during the liturgy, OCP offers no alternative to debuting its new tunes. When traditional hymns are offered, they’re often drawn from the Protestant tradition, or else the words are changed in odd ways (see, for example, its strange version of “Ubi Caritas”). The liturgical instructions are equally pathetic. On July 8 this year, the liturgical columnist passes on this profound summary of the gospel of the day: “Live and let live.” 

The Middle Way? 

Nevertheless, the OCP seems to have solved a major liturgical rift affecting today’s local churches. Just as every parish used to have a low-Mass crowd and a high-Mass crowd, there are now two factions in parishes: One wants more “contemporary” music of the sort seen in Life-Teen Masses— loud, rhythmic, and rockish. Another wants traditional music and sensibly asks whatever happened to the hymns of the old days. These two groups are forever at loggerheads and have been so for decades. In fact, most pastors are so sick of the dispute that they’ll do anything to avoid talking about music at Mass. 

This is where OCP steps in and serves as the peacekeeping moderate. After all, it’s an established music publisher, and thanks to the missalette, it doesn’t appear (at first) to be particularly partisan. Its literature contains enough traditional material to allow the liturgical team to claim they’re sensitive to the needs of both the contemporary and traditional factions. Indeed, the OCP eschews the most extreme forms of grunge-metal Life-Teen music (though its Spirit & Song comes close). At first sight, it does appear to take the middle ground between two extremes. In truth, however, it’s only slightly behind the curve of the most radical liturgical innovators — as it’s always behind the curve in the popular styles it tries to imitate. 

What about the other option of splitting up the Masses according to style, so that those who like traditional music can have their own Mass and the people who compose for the OCP can have theirs? Prendergast rejects this. Whether the style is traditional, contemporary, folk, or even “rock,” Prendergast says, “everyone in the parish has to be exposed to it.” And what if a pastor just doesn’t like rock and other contemporary styles? Prendergast says, “I would talk to the [chancery’s] Office of Worship about him.” I asked whether that means he would turn this poor priest in to the bishop. His response: “I would try to arrange for him to attend a workshop on liturgy.” 

With a great deal of knowledge, careful planning, and conscious intent, it is possible to manufacture decent liturgies even if the OCP music is all you have. You’ll have to dig to find the good hymns (10 to 20 percent in the typical OCP publications), but it can be done. It’s also true that not everyone involved with the OCP wants to destroy all that has gone before. There are probably many people on its middle-aged staff who from time to time cringe at the music, just as the people in the pews do. For his part, Prendergast is sure that he thinks with the mind of the Church, and there’s no reason to doubt his sincerity. 

In fact, there are periodic signs of hope. Regular readers of Today’s Liturgy might have been astounded to see the recent one-page article buried in its pages that urged children be taught Latin hymns and chant. “The Second Vatican Council did not destroy the tradition of chant,” said the writer, who was a student of the excellent English composer John Rutter. “We can still claim our chant heritage as part of the living Church’s journey into the future.” Indeed we can! But the news seems to be slow in getting around the OCP office. (The same issue contained a blast against a poor old lady who read a prayer book during Mass instead of singing goodness knows what.) 

What’s completely amazing about the entire OCP family is how lacking it is in self-awareness. The poor quality of contemporary Catholic music is a cultural cliché that turns up in late-night shows, Woody Allen movies, and Garrison Keillor’s Prairie Home Companion. It is legendary among real musicians. Ask an organist what he thinks about today’s Catholic music, and you will receive a raised eyebrow or a knowing laugh. 

What You Can Do Right Now 

The truth is that no one is happy with the state of Catholic liturgical music — least of all musicians — and the OCP is a big part of the problem. So, what can you do? Step 1 is to get rid of the liturgical planning guides and use an old Scripture index to select good hymns that have stood the test of time (if you absolutely must continue to use the OCP’s materials). Step 2 is to rein in the liturgical managers and explain to them that the Eucharist, and not music, is the reason people show up to Mass Sunday after Sunday. Step 3 is to get rid of the OCP hymnals and replace them with Adoremus or Collegeville or something from GIA (no, none of these is perfect, but they are all an oasis by comparison). 

Finally, reconsider those innocuous little missalettes. These harmless-looking booklets may be the source of the trouble. Parishes can unsubscribe — accept no OCP handouts or volume discounts. There are plenty of passable missalettes and hymnals out there, and all the choral music you’ll ever need is now public domain and easily downloadable for free (www.cpdl.org). 

In his book, The Spirit of the Liturgy (Ignatius Press, 2000), Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger states clearly that popular music does not belong at Mass. Indeed, it’s part of “a cult of the banal,” and “rock” plainly stands “in opposition to Christian worship.” 

This is very strong language from the cardinal. And yet we know that many liturgy teams in American parishes will continue to do what they’ve been doing for decades — systematically reconstructing the liturgy to accommodate pop aesthetic sensibilities. The liturgy is treated not as something sublimely different but as a well-organized social hour revolving around religious themes. 

It’s up to you to decide the future course of your parish’s liturgy: reverent worship or hootenanny. Despite what the OCP might tell you, you can’t have both. 

J. A. Turner is the choral director of a schola cantorum and writes frequently for Crisis.

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21 Responses to The Hidden Hand Behind Bad Catholic Music

  1. Mary Smith says:

    Any church in the Madison Diocese NOT using this publication…please stand up and sing a hymn!!!!!

  2. Curt Jacobsen says:

    Wow!! What an informative article. I never knew how much power the OCP had. It’s sad to say, but as outlandish as the video at the beginning of the article may seem, it is very similar to some of the things I’ve witnessed happen at mass in my own parish.

    This reminds me of what Life 102.5 and similar Christian radio stations are doing. They suck you in with their appealing, upbeat music….and then one starts hearing subtle attacks against the Catholic Church in their songs, “Cathedrals have tried in VAIN to show the image of your face……” and promos for things such as “NotReligion.com”. “It’s not about church, it’s not about rules, it’s about faith.”

    HUH???

    They might as well say, “It’s not about God, it’s not about the bible, it’s about faith.”

    Thankfully we have Relevant Radio.

  3. Tom Parker says:

    Has anyone thought of this: why buy a hymnal at all? It is not very difficult to create a one sheet handout that has all the necessary songs and responses for Mass and run it off each week. Why be tied down to the preferences of one music editorial board? Some of the best hymns are the old public domain stuff, and of course the Gregorian Chant is public domain. Another option which may be too radical for most Catholic Churches is projection. I have been to churches where text was projected and have found it quite reverent. I have been creating a handout each time for the traditional Latin Mass at my local parish and it’s no bother at all. I have been able to use some nice old material found in the Pius X and St. Greg’s hymnals.

  4. Ky Rose says:

    It’s hideous the loud audacious music. Especially when you have a choir director who thinks the church is a outside rock stadium and plays the piano like he is playing a tune from a bar and or soap opera saga during Eucharistic prayers. It is very annoying and it is hard for one to connect to God through noise. it is rather a sign of disrespect. The music is so loud where I attend, and I am a musician on the side outside being a court reporter/broadcast captioner and have a hearing loss sustained by the loud music at church. My hearing doctor recommended wearing ear plugs at church to offset it, but the music is so loud it penetrates right through the earplus, it has formed cracks in the walls and ceilings of the church. It’s hard to tell a untrained musical director, on who trained himself at home, how loud and awful he sounds, but it is strictly embarassment on his part.
    I don’t think loud audacious music needs to be played at every single mass. Why can’t they do how they accomodated us when we were so very young and have it played at only one mass or a few masses? There’s nothing wrong with that as the others who attend church put their funds into the pot and they have the right to deserve a mass of quietness and solitude? Someday, the young of today will age and will respect a quieter mass. This is disrespectfulness in the Catholic Church. No wonder so many people are leaving trying to find that solemnity again somewhere else. I prefer to stay at home and watch it on tv. We can worship God anywhere without the loud music. Pretty soon nobody will have any hearing left to listen to the audacious loud music as the decibels will ruin the nerves in the ear canals where people will not be able to hear then it won’t do anybody any benefit to play any kind of music. Perhaps this is what the Catholic Church is after wanting their congregation to go deaf.

  5. Sam Swanson says:

    I find G.I.A. to be more offensive then O.C.P. – When our parish changed from O.C.P. (Breaking Bread) to G.I.A. I felt like we took a step in the wrong direction. The Pastor is now working on getting music like Kirk Franklin’s “Stomp” into our worship environment. (look it up on youtube and have a great laugh) Liturgy it appears is not about praising god in song, but entertaining ourselves. Mass should have intermissions. Let’s do the ‘wave’ during Preparation. whooop there he is!

  6. Anne says:

    Wow! you guys have lost all focus on music in the liturgy. Are we not called to ministry each and every one of us?
    I am a music minister at a catholic church and it is definitely NOT about what type of music is sung. It’s about HOW the music is sung. Ask yourselvesd if you pray your song..does it come from a place in your heart that only God has touched.
    Don’t be so quick to judge others. Amen

  7. Ena Erlewine says:

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  8. Marty says:

    I don’t think that this discussion has lost focus. My job is to provide music for my congregation that enables their participation (whether internal or external) and provides SOLID CATHOLIC teaching. There might be room to quibble regarding genre, but we have to remember the impact the music we make has on our parishioners. If they become distracted from the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass or hear music which confusingly spins Catholic teaching, then we have done a great disservice.

  9. francis Randy Allen Schatz says:

    After reading this article I am dismayed. The author’s main point was that music should enhance and lift up the liturgy of the Mass. He says it in many and varied ways. What he doesn’t say is that the MASS is for the People of God not for God. God does not need the Mass, we do. God does not need our praise and thanksgiving. He is perfect in Himself. He needs nothing from us. We, on the other hand, need everything from God; His love, His forgiveness, life eternal, etc., etc. We are the ones who have sinned and fallen short of God’s glory. We are the ones who need our Lord Jesus to intercede to the Father for us at the holy Eucharist. We are the ones who respond at Mass, listen to the prayers, and sing the songs. All the parts of the Mass are to lift our hearts and minds to the saving God who loves us so much He would come down to heaven and give his very life to save us. If the words of the songs are truly Catholic and biblical, and the melody line we sing lifts our hearts and mind up to God why are we so worried if it has a rock beat or catchy new tune. How sad to believe that Gregorian chant and old Catholic hymns are the only things that enhance the Mass? No wonder our young people are swarming to the evangelical churches who inspire true worship from the heart with those same catchy tunes, or not going to church at all.

  10. Paul Dawson says:

    So true Mr. Schatz. The Roman cadre have been trying to undo the changes of Vatican II since John the 23rd died. Go to St. Peters and look at the crowd around the body of John the 23rd. The believers praying for him to come back. Our backward thinking leaders believe that if we return to the Latin mass, sing some Gregorian chant, the crowds will come back. JR wants a “purer, smaller church” He is going to get it along with smaller contributions, from fixed income senior citizens. The church is a living thing. Living things grow, evolve, and adapt. Music changes, styles change, people change, but conservatives are afraid of change. Expand, Grow , Adapt. Let the music bring change; new sounds from new cultures. Do you think the people of Jamaica are praising God with Gregorian chant? Is their worship less holy than some “HOLY” church in middle America? If and when you get to your final reward – ask Him. He is the person listening to Greenday.
    PS. I have sung in a RC church choir since 4th grade, in 1958. I know church music and can listen to Palestrina or Led Zepplin and enjoy them both.

  11. Lynna says:

    The real problem is that OCP does it so badly.

    Instead of trying to be what it’s not (a la Sister Act), the Church would do better to be what it is.

    I’m a convert Catholic and I was surprised and disappointed to find that our choir does not do any of that gorgeous, glorious, uplifting stuff. It does “Breaking Bread”. Recently at a wedding I heard that same choir do traditional music (at the bride’s request). It was gorgeous.

    You don’t reach young people through imitating what you’re not or being derivative. While the Church makes itself pathetic trying to insert a rock beat that isn’t there naturally, meanwhile the kids are searching for something authentic – and a lot of them are listening to young superstars singing old traditional hymns (studio mixed to sound gorgeous, not loud).

  12. Kathy says:

    I would not expect to go to a rock concert or a local pub and hear Gregorian Chant, it would be ridiculously out of place and inappropriate. Like the author stated, the music in church should be vertical, such that it uplifts your spirit, not horizontal involving only the physical. It’s as different as entering an old one room school house, that fills in as a church on Sunday, or entering a cathedral. It’s not a question of being conservative or liberal, this type of thinking only brings opposition and division.
    I’m so tired of the “hip” and “groovy” people who just can’t seem to let go of the 60’s. Maybe they haven’t noticed that we have all put our bra’s back on…

  13. Michael says:

    I am an organist in three Catholic Churches. I like SOME of EACH of the hymnals mentioned…HOWEVER..I cannot STAND the 70’s and 80’s Country Western/Faux Born-Again/Folk group junk in them. If I could legally do it, I would forever ban “On Eagles Wings”, “Be Not Afraid”, “Here I Am Lord (Which is NOT a funeral hymn, it is a SERVICE hymn), “How Great Thou Art”, “Amazing Grace”, “Gentle Woman” and all those other horrid, wretched, stomach-churning “Ballads” that the remnants of the 70’s and 80’s just love to hear over and over and over again. I just cannot stand it anymore. There are so many other appropriate, gorgeous
    REAL Liturgical hymns and psalms ESPECIALLY for Funerals and Weddings, but no one hears them because they are “too Churchy”…Too Churchy? As opposed to Our Lady of The Minskoff Theater? St. Bobby-Jo’s Roadside Grille? It’s just ridiculous and so frustrating. I agree with the comment earlier about not having hymnals, but doing “Hymn Print Sheets” and handing them out to the congregation as they enter the church! GREAT IDEA!!

  14. Michael says:

    lol Kathy…great post

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  17. John says:

    May the peace of Christ be with you all. I pray that all music ministers, as worship leaders at mass, continue to open their hearts and minds to the presence of Christ in our midst and that God’s will is realized as we all worship in prayer song.

    The original author states:
    “But while the OCP dictates the liturgies of most U.S. parishes, it has no ecclesiastical authority. It’s a large nonprofit corporation — a publishing wing of the Diocese of Portland — and nothing else. It has never been empowered by the U.S. bishops, much less Rome, to oversee music or liturgy in American parishes.”

    I am not defending what OCP or other publishers are doing. But when we make an argument about someone, some group, or some thing, we need to be sure that we are centered on Christ and that statements we make do not overreach beyond what is the truth.
    I think the original author is overstating their case. OCP does not dictate liturgies of most US Parishes. If it happens, local parishes are allowing this to happen. And since OCP does not have control over our parishes, stating that OCP has no ecclesiastical authority is moot. Having said this, if one looks under their copyright page in their missals and music books, their approval from USCCB is printed: “Published with the approval of the Committee on Divine Worship, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.” Not ecclesiastical authority, but OCP publishes their works with the approval of the USCCB.

    In reviewing music, there are many styles to consider. And Vatican II allows for this to happen. Any parishioner (including music ministers) will definitely have their preferences, just as many posted on this site. However, to demonize music styles and songs that actually are liturgically appropriate, such as “On Eagle’s Wings”, “Here I Am, Lord”, etc. is probably not reading the words and is not understanding time and place when the music is song. What is useful for one parish may not be useful in another parish. In a large parish, what may be useful at one mass may be inappropriate at another mass. We can look at things solely in a “legalistic” way and take all the suggestions regarding music in the liturgy at face value (such as the suggestions for chant, the organ, etc.) or we can take into account that as music ministers, we are worship leaders and are called to be pastoral as well when making music selections. This is based on the notion that music ministers are not performers but helping the entire assembly to pray in song.

    I have heard these arguments before in the 30+ years of my music ministry in the Church. I like all styles of liturgical music and they all have their place in the mass. It is okay for an individual to have their opinion, or personal revelation, regarding music in the mass. I feel it is inappropriate to provide such an opinion on one style of music liturgy and at the same time demonizing other styles of music that are quite appropriate to the liturgy of the mass.

    Thank you for providing your opinion. There were components of the article that provide food for thought. May God’s blessing be with you always.

  18. John says:

    May the peace of Christ be with you all. I pray that all music ministers, as worship leaders at mass, continue to open their hearts and minds to the presence of Christ in our midst and that God’s will is realized as we all worship in prayer song.

    The original author states:
    “But while the OCP dictates the liturgies of most U.S. parishes, it has no ecclesiastical authority. It’s a large nonprofit corporation — a publishing wing of the Diocese of Portland — and nothing else. It has never been empowered by the U.S. bishops, much less Rome, to oversee music or liturgy in American parishes.”

    I am not defending what OCP or other publishers are doing. But when we make an argument about someone, some group, or some thing, we need to be sure that we are centered on Christ and that statements we make do not overreach beyond what is the truth.
    I think the original author is overstating their case. OCP does not dictate liturgies of most US Parishes. If it happens, local parishes are allowing this to happen. And since OCP does not have control over our parishes, stating that OCP has no ecclesiastical authority is moot. Having said this, if one looks under their copyright page in their missals and music books, their approval from USCCB is printed: “Published with the approval of the Committee on Divine Worship, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.” Not ecclesiastical authority, but OCP publishes their works with the approval of the USCCB.

    In reviewing music, there are many styles to consider. And Vatican II allows for this to happen. Any parishioner (including music ministers) will definitely have their preferences, just as many posted on this site. However, to demonize music styles and songs that actually are liturgically appropriate, such as “On Eagle’s Wings”, “Here I Am, Lord”, etc. is probably not reading the words and is not understanding time and place when the music is song. What is useful for one parish may not be useful in another parish. In a large parish, what may be useful at one mass may be inappropriate at another mass. We can look at things solely in a “legalistic” way and take all the suggestions regarding music in the liturgy at face value (such as the suggestions for chant, the organ, etc.) or we can take into account that as music ministers, we are worship leaders and are called to be pastoral as well when making music selections. This is based on the notion that music ministers are not performers but helping the entire assembly to pray in song.

    I have heard these arguments before in the 30+ years of my music ministry in the Church. I like all styles of liturgical music and they all have their place in the mass. It is okay for an individual to have their opinion, or personal revelation, regarding music in the mass. I feel it is inappropriate to provide such an opinion on one style of music liturgy and at the same time demonizing other styles of music that are quite appropriate to the liturgy of the mass.

    Thank you for providing your opinion. There were components of the article that provide food for thought. May God’s blessing be with you always.

  19. jean claude martini

    The Hidden Hand Behind Bad Catholic Music | Mary\’s Anawim

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